Vitamin A.......

May 1, 2018

 

 

 

Vitamin A (Retinol) Blood Test, this is requested to detect Vitamin A Deficiency or Toxicity.

 

Retinol is the primary form of Vitamin A. Our bodies can't make Vitamin A, our dietary sources are really important to produce it - MEAT sources provide vitamin A (Retinol) while vegetables and fruit sources provide carotene (a substance that can be converted into vitamin A by the Liver)

 

Vitamin A is stored in the liver and fat tissues (it is fat-soluble), and healthy adults may have as much as 1 years worth stored in there bodies.

 

Our bodies holds a relatively stable concentration in the blood through our feedback system, this then releases Vitamin A from storage as needed and increases or decreases the efficiency of dietary vitamin A absorption.

 

Vitamin A deficiencies are rare in the UK however it may be cause through malnutrition or people who have Coeliac Disease, Cystic Fibrosis or Chronic Pancreatitis in the older generation and those with alcoholism & Liver Disease.

 

You can however have too much Vitamin A going on in your body, by overusing vitamin supplements! It can also occur sometimes when, in your diet you consume a high proportion of foods, from animal sources, that are high in Vitamin A, such as Liver.

 

The symptoms you may have for Vitamin A deficiency are:-
Night Blindness
Dry eyes, Hair & Skin
Repeated Infection
Anaemia

 

The symptoms you may have for Vitamin A toxicity are:-
Headaches
Double or blurred vision
Fatigue
Weaknesses
Weight loss
Hair loss
Bone & joint pain.

 

Unfortunately Vitamin A (Retinol-Binding Protein) isn't a common Blood Test that is carried out at your Local GP Surgery, However Bloods4you CAN provide You with this Blood Test, in the comfort and privacy of your own home or workplace!
You choose the date & time that suits your busy schedule.

 

To book your vitamin A Blood Test please telephone or email us today.
#bloods4you

 

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